Moths & Butterflies in Virginia

Monarch butterfly
Monarch butterfly
Source: National Park Service

As the human population grows in Virginia, habitat is transformed and wildlife populations are affected. Clearing the forests for agriculture in the 1600-1800's, and the expansion of the suburbs in the 1900's, had the greatest impact. Some species, such as the passenger pigeon, will never be seen again. Others, such as the buffalo, will never reappear in the wild in Virginia. Some, such as the pileated woodpecker, are struggling to survive in habitat that has been fragmented by roads and fields.

Butterflies and moths, however, are likely to survive the transformation of Virginia's natural setting. These insects are able to fly to isolated pockets of habitat, including gardens planted in suburbia intentionally to attract butterflies. The species composition of the butterflies and moths of Virginia has changed as forests were replaced with fields, but future generations of Virginians may be able to enjoy some wildlife right in front yards.

A special effort is underway to save monarch butterflies in Virginia and across North America. The population that migrated from wintering grounds in Mexico to the Northeast declined by 80% after the mid-1990's, dropping to only 200 million in 2018. The population that wintered in Monterey and Pacific Grove, California and migrated into the Pacific Northwest dropped by 98%, from 1.2 million to just 30,000.1

Recovery of the monarch is facilitated by people planting native species of milkweed. The caterpillars in the Spring and Summer depend upon milkweed as their food source.

Monarch butterflies transition from eggs to caterpillar, then metamorphose in a chrysalis into a butterfly
Monarch butterflies transition from eggs to caterpillar, then metamorphose in a chrysalis into a butterfly
Source: National Park Service, Monarch Life Cycle

In the Fall, adult monarchs migrate through Virginia and from Virginia to the Gulf Coast before flying to Mexico. Some may choose to spend the winter in South Florida roosts.2

Links

Monarch caterpillar feeding on milkweed
Monarch caterpillar feeding on milkweed

References

1. "Scientists scramble to learn why monarch butterflies are dying so quickly," UPI, July 22, 2019, https://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2019/07/22/Scientists-scramble-to-learn-why-monarch-butterflies-are-dying-so-quickly/6961563481223/ (last checked July 24, 2019)
2. "Like your grandparents, monarch butterflies are now wintering in Florida," Popular Science, January 2, 2019, https://www.popsci.com/monarch-butterflies-winter-destinations-florida/; Hannah B. Vander Zanden, Carol L. Chaffee, Antonio Gonz謾lez-Rodr鉚guez, D.T. Tyler Flockhart, D. Ryan Norris, Marta L. Wayne, "Alternate migration strategies of eastern monarch butterflies revealed by stable isotopes," Animal Migration, Volume 5, Issue 1 (January, 2019) https://doi.org/10.1515/ami-2018-0006 (last checked December 25, 2019)

plants in the milkweed family, such as Asclepias syriaca, provide toxins to monarch butterflies that protect the adults from predation
plants in the milkweed family, such as Asclepias syriaca, provide toxins to monarch butterflies that protect the adults from predation

monarchs feed on milkweed as caterpillars, and on the nectar/pollen as adults
monarchs feed on milkweed as caterpillars, and on the nectar/pollen as adults
Source: National Park Service, Monarch Butterfly on Milkweed Plant


Habitats and Species
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